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  • Christopher Mellon

Unprecedented UAP Legislation

Unbeknownst to most Americans, President Biden just signed into law far-reaching legislation that could soon confirm the existence of an alien presence on earth. The relevant provisions, incorporated into legislation needed to provide funding for the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Intelligence Community (IC), enjoys strong bipartisan support in both the House and Senate. This is arguably the biggest story mainstream news organizations have ever failed to cover. Among other things, this new legislation:


  1. Provides greatly enhanced authorities and resources for the ‘All-Domain Anomaly Resolution Office’ or ‘(AARO),’ which now reports directly to the leaders of the Defense Department and the Intelligence Community. The organization’s unusual name is intended to clarify that its purview extends to anomalous objects regardless of their location (i.e. land, air, undersea, or space).

  2. Mandates a review of all intelligence documents involving UAP from 1945 to the present.

  3. Requires DoD, DHS, and the IC to identify any non-disclosure agreements related to UAP and provide those to the new AARO office.

  4. Directs the new AARO office to develop a UAP science plan to assess the sometimes mysterious and mind-bending capabilities being reported as well as a collection plan to leverage America’s vast technical intelligence apparatus to determine where these objects are coming from and their capabilities and intent. This aggressive UAP investigation, using America’s unparalleled intelligence capabilities, is what I hoped to accomplish when I brought the famous DoD UAP videos (“Gimbal” and “Flir”) and Lue Elizondo to the NYT and the oversight committees on Capitol Hill in December, 2017. Recall that Mr. Elizondo had just resigned his position on the staff of the Secretary of Defense in protest over DoD inaction in the face of innumerable violations of restricted DoD airspace by UAP.

  5. Provides a secure process for anyone who has signed an official US government secrecy agreement related to UAP to come forward and reveal that information to AARO and to Congress, regardless of the level of classification, without fear of retribution or prosecution. This provision is intended to determine the veracity of longstanding allegations indicating that the US government has recovered extraterrestrial technology and perhaps even extraterrestrial beings. The alleged UAP crash in 1947 near Roswell, New Mexico, offers the most famous example, but there are many others. For example, in his new book Trinity: The Best Kept Secret, the renowned writer, scientist and venture capitalist Dr. Jacques Vallee surfaces a new case of alleged ET spacecraft recovery operations.


The historical intelligence document review, and the review of government secrecy agreements, should be completed over the next 18 months. That process alone could validate claims the US government has been concealing proof of an extraterrestrial presence near earth. If it seems unbelievable that Congress would pass such legislation, it is only because of the paucity of reporting on the facts that caused members of both parties in Congress to join together to pass these provisions.


Even before this ‘whistleblower’ legislation was signed into law, credible individuals were providing Congress

information alleging that the US government has recovered extraterrestrial technology. This process began in 2019 when I brought astrophysicist Dr. Eric Davis to Capitol Hill to meet with staff from the Senate Intelligence and Armed Services committees. Dr. Davis, author of the famous Wilson-Davis memo, provided specific information lending credence to sensational reports that an official US government program is actively seeking to exploit recovered technology that was fashioned by some other species or perhaps advanced AI machines. Much of the information Dr. Davis provided remains highly classified, but the good news is that these sensational claims, which have the potential to transform our understanding of the universe and man’s place within it, are now being taken seriously and properly investigated. I’ve brought others besides Dr. Davis and Lue Elizondo to the Hill and the AARO office and I am encouraging anyone else who may be able to help set the record straight to step forward as well.


I’m not claiming that the information provided to Congress or to AARO proves that earth has been visited by extraterrestrials. However, Dr. Davis and Mr. Elizondo and other witnesses are credible former government officials who worked on highly classified government programs. Having heard their reports, and those of others who are coming forward, I can vouch for the fact that the AARO office has serious leads to pursue. The media is doing the public a great disservice by ignoring the UAP issue because a sudden shocking revelation runs the risk of being far more disruptive and disturbing than information gradually processed and absorbed. If these claims prove true, blindsiding the public greatly increases the risk of negative consequences.


Although it is true that Congress could seek to keep the AARO office’s findings confidential, it is doubtful that this information can be kept under wraps for long if confirmed. I say that not because the government is incapable of keeping secrets. Indeed, the reverse is more nearly true: DoD and DoE black programs are almost never compromised. By contrast, intelligence reports (e.g. reports on the Iranian nuclear program) often leak because policymakers want to influence public opinion, but even in those cases the technical or human sources behind the reporting are rarely revealed. In fact, while serving as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Intelligence at DoD, I can only recall one instance of a DoD special access program being compromised and that was simply because the capability was used in combat during the Gulf War. In the case of UAP, however, the individuals coming forward want the information to be disclosed, as do many members of Congress who are the recipients of the information being gathered by AARO. In that regard, I recently had the opportunity to ask Senator Gillibrand, a leading sponsor of the legislation, whether she would support revealing the existence of alien technology if the whistleblower process confirms these sensational allegations. Without missing a beat, she replied: “Of course! Why not?” Most members of Congress and their staff, and most of those coming forward presenting evidence, seem to agree that the American people have a right to know. This is therefore a case where I believe the truth, whatever it proves to be, will prevail in the not too distant future.


Even if the UAP whistleblower provision and UAP document reviews being mandated by Congress do not lead to confirmation of an ET presence near Earth, ongoing governmental and scientific investigations of UAP activity might lead to the same conclusion. Now that the anti-UAP stigma is being lifted, and the government has established UAP reporting procedures, fresh data regarding hundreds of new UAP incidents is pouring in. At last count the official number of UAP incidents was at 400, and is still rapidly increasing. If the media is guilty of the sin of omission when it comes to reporting on the unprecedented, bipartisan UAP legislation that was just signed into law, they are guilty of the sin of commission when it comes to misleading reporting regarding UAP activity detected by DoD and the IC. I’ll have more to say about that soon. For the moment, I’ll simply venture to predict that the facts, when they emerge, will directly contradict recent reporting in the Wall Street Journal by Holman Jenkins Jr. and Seth Shostak, as well as reporting in the New York Times by Julian Barnes, which claims that conventional explanations have been found for most of the UAP reports identified by DoD and the IC. I believe that the report, when it emerges, will deepen the UAP mystery rather than provide explanations for the burgeoning number of UAP incidents involving violations of US airspace.


Consider that although the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has produced nothing of import, despite decades of work, it is still rightly regarded as a worthwhile effort. The most notable SETI incident occurred back in the 70’s, when a strangely powerful and mysterious signal was detected. It has become famously known as the Wow! signal. Although it remains unexplained, there is now some reason to believe it may have had a terrestrial origin. By contrast, the US government has only just begun officially investigating UAP with modern sensors yet we already have hundreds of official military cases that defy conventional explanation. Hundreds of Wow!-like events, most involving data from multiple sensors! Moreover, in some cases, the ET hypothesis seems the best or only viable explanation (e.g. the Nimitz case which left no doubt in the minds of some of the Navy pilots and radar operators).


I therefore suggest giving the UAP investigative process a chance and I am frankly baffled why anyone would expect DoD or the IC to have firm answers when the AARO office is only just beginning to be properly staffed and funded. Would we expect SETI to find definitive proof of aliens the moment they began collecting data? Meanwhile, with this recently passed legislation, Americans have reason to hope we will soon know the truth of legendary allegations that the US government has recovered alien technology. For those seized with curiosity over the UAP issue, I can’t imagine a better Christmas gift than this new UAP legislation.


Merry Christmas, with special thanks and appreciation to the members of Congress and their staffs who have put national security and science ahead of stigma and ignorance.


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